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Chapter 13: Water and Forests

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Lockaby, Graeme; Nagy, Chelsea; Vose, James M.; Ford, Chelcy R.; Sun, Ge; McNulty, Steve; Caldwell, Pete; Cohen, Erika; Moore Meyers, Jennifer

Year Published

2011

Publication

In: Wear, David N.; Greis, John G., eds. Southern Forest Futures Project. 85p.

Abstract

Forest conversion to agriculture or urban use consistently causes increased discharge, peak flow, and velocity of streams. Subregional differences in hydrologic responses to urbanization are substantial. Sediment, water chemistry indices, pathogens, and other substances often become more concentrated after forest conversion. If the conversion is to an urban use, the resulting additional increases in discharge and concentrations will produce even higher loads. Although physiographic characteristics such as slope and soil texture play key roles in hydrologic and sediment responses to land use conversion, land use (rather than physiography) is the primary driver of water chemistry responses. Conversion of forest land to urban uses may decrease the supply of water available for human consumption and increase potential threats to human health.

Citation

Lockaby, Graeme; Nagy, Chelsea; Vose, James M.; Ford, Chelcy R.; Sun, Ge; McNulty, Steve; Caldwell, Pete; Cohen, Erika; Moore Meyers, Jennifer. 2011. Chapter 13: Water and Forests. In: Wear, David N.; Greis, John G., eds. Southern Forest Futures Project. 85p.

Last updated on: December 13, 2012