Publication Details

Effect of simulated insect damage on growth and survival of northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.) seedlings

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Wright, Susan L.; Hall, Richard W.; Peacock, John W.

Year Published

1989

Publication

Environmental Entomology. 18(2): 235-239.

Abstract

Effects of simulated insect damage—artificial defoliation and root damage in combination with two levels of watering—were studied to determine the potential effect on northern red oak seedlings (Quercus rubra L.). Treatments and treatment combinations caused significant differences in stem diameter, percentage of stem dieback, and mortality. Defoliation and a regime of decreased watering seemed to have the greatest effect on seedling growth and mortality. Root injury had no consistent direct effect, but interacted significantly with other factors. Insect damage to foliage and roots, together with water stress, may be a factor in poor survival of oak seedlings under field conditions.

Keywords

Insecta; Quercus; defoliation; roots

Citation

Wright, Susan L.; Hall, Richard W.; Peacock, John W. 1989. Effect of simulated insect damage on growth and survival of northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.) seedlings. Environmental Entomology. 18(2): 235-239.

Last updated on: March 23, 2017