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Feeding biology of Cerambycids

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Year Published

2017

Publication

In: Wang, Qiao, ed. Cerambycidae of the world; biology and pest management. Boca Raton, FLP CRC Press: 105-124.

Abstract

There are more than 36,000 species of Cerambycidae recognized throughout the world (see Chapter 1), occurring on all continents except Antarctica (Linsley 1959). Given such numbers, it is not surprising that cerambycids display great diversity in their feeding habits. Both adults and larvae are almost exclusively phytophagous. Some adults appear not to feed at all, while others feed daily. Larvae primarily utilize woody host plants, but some species develop within herbaceous plants. Cerambycid larvae infest nearly all plant parts, especially stems, branches, and roots, as well as feed on nearly all plant tissues, especially bark, cambium, and wood. As expected in such a large insect family, some cerambycids are strictly monophagous while others are highly polyphagous. Similarly, some cerambycids infest live, healthy plants while others develop in dead plants; likewise, some species prefer moist wood, while others prefer dry wood. Cerambycid larvae are able to digest woody tissues with the aid of enzymes that they sometimes secrete themselves or that they obtain from symbionts. Many details on the feeding biology of cerambycids will be provided in this chapter, including the types of food consumed by adults and larvae, the common parts of plants that larvae infest and the tissues they consume, and aspects of wood digestion.

Citation

Haack, Robert A. 2017. Feeding biology of cerambycids. Chapter 3. In: Wang, Qiao, ed. Cerambycidae of the world; biology and pest management. Boca Raton, FLP CRC Press: 105-124.

Last updated on: July 27, 2017