Publication Details

Importance of midges to migrating birds along northern Lake Huron

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Haack, Robert A.; Ewert, David N.; Hudson, Patrick L.

Year Published

2021

Publication

Newsletter of the Michigan Entomological Society. 65(3): 9-13.

Abstract

The northern Lake Huron shoreline in Michigan's Upper Peninsula has a largely east west orientation, extending from St. Ignace eastward to DeTour Village and then to neighboring Drummond Island (Fig. 1). Given this orientation, this shoreline intercepts large numbers of spring migrating birds after they fly across Lake Huron. These birds need to rest and refuel. For many of the insectivorous passerines or perching birds such as warblers (Fig. 2), vireos, and thrushes, they often arrive before the hardwood trees have fully leafed out and thus there are relatively few terrestrial insects available, such as cater pillars. Nevertheless, many aquatic insects, especially midges (Diptera: Chironomidae; Fig. 3), emerge in large numbers along the shores of Lake Huron and other lakes and streams in early spring and can serve as prey items for many migrating birds.

Keywords

midge; Chironomidae; bird; warbler; neotropical migrants

Citation

Haack, Robert A.; Ewert, David N.; Hudson, Patrick L. 2021. Importance of midges to migrating birds along northern Lake Huron. Newsletter of the Michigan Entomological Society. 65(3): 9-13.

Last updated on: September 21, 2021