Publication Details

Effects of Small Patch Cutting on Sugar Maple Regeneration in New Hampshire Northern Hardwoods

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Leak, William B.; Leak, William B.

Year Published

2005

Publication

Northern Journal of Applied Forestry. 22(1): 68-70.

Abstract

In many northern hardwood stands in New Hampshire and New England, partial cutting or single-tree selection result,s in understories with a high proportion of beech and other species with low timber values. Patch cutting, using small openings of about 1/4-ac in size or larger coupled with sufficient logging disturbance, has proved to be an effective way to replace understories of beech and other less valuable species with a new stand containing a high proportion of yellow and paper birch in mixture with other deciduous species. Unless present as well-developed advanced regeneration, sugar maple is seldom common in the new stands produced by small patch cutting. However, when these early successional stands reach 40-50 years of age, understories dominated by sugar maple and with lesser proportions of beech frequently develop, possibly due to the rich leaf-fall, lower proportions of beech litter, and/or changed light conditions. Although small patch cutting may not immediately regenerate abundant sugar maple, it appears as though this technique may help over time to maintain sugar maple as a significant component of northern hardwood forests.

Keywords

Northern hardwoods; patch cutting; sugar maple

Citation

Leak, William B. 2005. Effects of Small Patch Cutting on Sugar Maple Regeneration in New Hampshire Northern Hardwoods. Northern Journal of Applied Forestry. 22(1): 68-70.

Last updated on: October 18, 2007